2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT Performance Edition: A Kick in the Horse

The most powerful variant of Ford’s electric crossover SUV offers even quicker acceleration.

Source: MotorTrend

Good things come to those who wait, as evidenced by the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT. Unlike Ford’s lesser Mustang Mach-E models, which are due to go on sale before the end of the year, the Blue Oval plans to start selling the high-end Mach-E GT in late summer 2021—next year, at the time of this writing. As the most powerful iteration of the Blue Oval’s electric SUV, the GT trim packs a total of 480 hp—134 more than the next most powerful Mach-E model—from two electric motors, which Ford estimates launches the SUV to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds. It also offers an estimated driving range of 250 miles by way of an 88-kWh battery pack—and a light right foot. In other words, the Mach-E GT’s inherent performance is arguably worth waiting for.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach E GT Performance Edition 2

It turns out Ford left some of the Mach-E GT’s dynamic capabilities on the cutting room floor, though, given the brand’s announcement of the even torquier GT Performance Edition. Although the Performance Edition maintains the horsepower figure of the standard GT, the model’s two electric motors now produce a total of 634 lb-ft of torque—34 lb-ft of twist more than the run-of-the-mill GT. That extra grunt allows the Mustang Mach-E GT Performance Edition to hit the mile-a-minute mark in an estimated 3.5 seconds. Accompanying the Performance Edition’s improved acceleration are items such as 20-inch wheels wrapped in sticky Pirelli summer rubber, adaptive dampers, and special badging.

car

Unfortunately, the Performance Edition’s dynamic improvements net an estimated driving range of just 235 miles on a full charge, a drop of 15 miles relative to the normal Mach-E GT. Still, that distance ought to satiate the needs of most consumers. 

Ford’s yet to share pricing for the Mustang Mach-E GT Performance Edition. That said, we wager the Performance Edition kit adds a few thousand dollars to the Mach-E GT’s estimated $61,600 starting price.

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Ford Trucks

Source: Ford

Ford Trucks

Ford Motor Company of Canada began building trucks during the Model T years. As in the U.S., they were known as Model TT’s. One major departure from the American trucks came in 1928 – during the Model AA era.

In order to adequately haul heavier loads, Ford Motor Company of Canada began building trucks with dual-wheel rear axles. These were dubbed Model AAC (“C” for Canada). It was not until 1930 that the U.S. built dual-wheel trucks.

Military Vehicles

Military Vehicles

During World War II, Ford Motor Company of Canada produced some 335,000 vehicles for defence. Some were cars, station wagons and trucks similar to civilian models.

Ford built a large number of trucks known as CMP’s (Canadian Military Pattern). Bodies conformed to a military design, but used Ford running gear. (General Motors also built CMP’s, using Chevrolet power train.)

Ford Motor Company of Canada also produced military vehicles known as Universal Carriers.

Mercury Trucks

Mercury Trucks

Right after World War II, when Ford Motor Company of Canada set up the Ford/Monarch and Mercury/Lincoln dealership networks, a new truck line was established. All Mercury dealers had Mercury trucks to sell. After the wartime shortage of chrome, and the painted grilles on the Ford trucks, the new Mercury trucks were spectacular.

Their grilles had six broad horizontal chrome bars, a large chrome cap at the tops of the grille, a broad chrome enhancement along the middle of the hood, and chrome headlight and parking light rims.

Meteor Trucks

Meteor Trucks

Ford introduced its new all-steel station wagon for 1952. It was called the Ranch Wagon, and there was a similar Ranch Wagon in the Meteor lineup. Ford had a sedan delivery based on the Ranch Wagon body, so Meteor also offered a sedan delivery.

Though production was never very high, Meteor sedan Deliveries were produced though to 1961, when just 67 were made. 

Import Fords
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Post-War Fords

Source: Ford.ca

Post-War Fords

Generally, Fords built in Canada mirrored their American counterparts. At times, a body type may have been omitted from Canadian production, but still offered in limited numbers as an import.

However, there was one was one leading deviation by post-war Canadian Fords from the U.S. pattern. That concerned all the 1954 Fords. It was for that year the U.S. discarded the old flat-head V-8 to introduce the new more powerful ohv V-8.

Ford Motor Company of Canada did not offer the new engine until the 1955 models. So, the 1954 Canadian-built Fords retained the old flat-head V-8. For 1952 and 1953, all Ford used the 239 cid 110 hp engine.

However, the 1954 Customline and Crestline series got the larger 255 cid version, rated at 120 hp. That was the engine the two upper lines of Meteor had used.

When the new V-8 came to Canadian Fords, it was the 272 cid engine rated at 162 hp. No power-pack or other engine options were available.

Finally, after a 15-year delay, the six-cylinder motor was available as a delete option in the early spring of 1956.

In any 1957 Fords which did not have the six, the new V-8 appeared. It displaced 272 cubic inches like the American-made Fords. However, the power rating was only a 190 hp in Canada, but 205 in the U.S.

In subsequent years, engines in Canadian Fords were similar to American models. Some power ratings may have differed, and some optional engines may not have been obtainable in Canada.

After, the Canada-U.S. Auto Pact came into effect in 1965, a greater quantity of the models not made in Canada were imported duty-free from the States. The Mustang and Thunderbird are two examples.

On very rare occasions, dealers would concoct a variation from the normal production model. In 1968 and 1969, at least one Ford dealer sold a special Custom two-door sedan model. It featured a vinyl-covered roof, and the LTD front end with hidden headlights. This was an unusual combination of prestige in the very bottom end of the full-size Ford range.

Mercury 114

Mercury 114

In 1939, the 703 Ford dealers across Canada sold both Fords and Mercurys. A few dealers sold Lincolns. After World War II, Ford Motor Company of Canada split their dealer network into two divisions. Existing dealers sold Ford, the new Monarch, and Ford trucks.

A new branch of dealers sold Mercurys, imported Lincolns, and a new line of Mercury trucks. By 1947, Ford Motor Company of Canada had 1,113 dealers, 353 of which were Mercury-Lincoln outlets.

Because Ford was in the low-priced field, it was more popular in Canada than the medium-priced Mercury. So that the new Mercury dealers could get a piece of the low-priced action, a smaller lower-cost Mercury line emerged.

Meteor phase 1

Meteor (Phase 1)

All Ford products shed their old prewar styling for a postwar new look. Of course, Ford of Canada’s unique models also embraced the new styling.

A June 25, 1948 press release stated, “The Mercury and Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited announced today that it would shortly introduce a brand new automobile in the low-priced field, to be known as the ‘Meteor.’ It will be exclusive to the Canadian market and will be distributed by the Mercury and Lincoln dealers across the Dominion.”

Monarch

Monarch

When the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited developed the Mercury 114, Mercury dealers had an advantage over Ford dealers. They could sell cars in both low- and mid-priced fields. So that the Canadian Ford dealers could compete on a level playing field, Ford of Canada established a new make in the Mercury 118 class. Based on Mercury, it was called Monarch, and made its debut in 1946.

It used a chromed Mercury grille frame, and replaced Mercury’s many thin vertical bars with three horizontal bars. Below the main grille, Mercury had two long oval openings. Monarch had these also, but placed just one bar across each instead of two as Mercury had.

Edsel

Edsel

Few cars have ever been introduced with as much hype and excitement as the Edsel. It brought in huge crowds to kick its tires, but failed to find many buyers.

Ford Motor Company of Canada made a wise decision by having existing Ford dealers handle the Edsel. In hindsight, it was much better than setting up an entirely new dealer network as was done stateside.

Frontenac

Frontenac

Frontenac was a Governor of New France in the latter 17th century. His name was used on a Canadian car built by Durant in 1931. When Ford Motor Company of Canada introduced a compact car for 1960, it seemed strange that they chose a name used by another company. But after 29 years, only the oldest of car trivia fanatics would remember.

The Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited was keeping quite a level playing field for its two dealer chains. For just about every model the Ford branch sold, the Mercury-Meteor branch had a comparable model to sell.

Meteor phase 2

Meteor (Phase 2)

The sudden and late decision by the U.S. to stop making the Mercury Meteor left Ford Motor Company of Canada in a dilemma. Some quotes from the PRODUCT IMAGE AND STRATEGY document from Ford of Canada’s Product Planning Office sheds some light on how the Canadian company responded to this predicament.

“The Meteor’s principal competition is the Pontiac, the industry leader. . . .The Canadian Pontiac has the U.S. Pontiac Catalina body shell with a Chevrolet chassis and driveline including 230 CID six cylinder engine.” 

More Unique Mercurys

More Unique Mercurys

The Ford-based Meteor was heralded by the Mercury 114. Likewise, a low cost Mercury model preceded the Mercury-based Meteor. For 1963, Ford Motor Company of Canada made available the Mercury 400.

This Canadian-only, entry-level, full-size Mercury looked like a stripped Monterey. There were no Monterey nameplates on the car, nor was there any 400 ID’s.

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Ford Canada: A Heritage as Rich as the Land Itself

Enjoy 100+ years of sometimes exclusive, always exciting cars & trucks built by Ford of Canada

Pre-War Fords

Canada’s climate is colder, its population is smaller, and its economy is different compared with the United States. These and other factors have set the stage for some fascinating differences in Canadian cars over the last century. Even cars produced by the same manufacturer often digressed from the American pattern. What follows is a review of the uniqueness found in many vehicles produced by the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited during its long and illustrious history.

The first car built by the Ford Motor Company of Canada in early 1904 was the Model C. A total of 117 cars were made in the first year. Most were 2-cylinder Model C’s but a few 4-cylinder Model B’s were also built. Both were made in 1905 along with the Model F, a new 2-cylinder car.

In 1906, the Model C and Model B were discontinued, but two new models came on the scene. The Model N was a low-priced 4-cylinder car, but the 406 cid 6-cylinder Model K was huge and expensive.

The Model F was gone by 1907, but there were two new Fords – Model R and Model S. Both were 4-cylinder cars, and built along with the Model N and Model K through much of 1908.

Production of all those models ceased when the Model T made its debut in October 1908. The Canadian-made Fords were similar to the American models, although there may have been minor departures due to the use of Canadian components. Ford Motor Company of Canada constantly tried to keep a high level of Canadian content.

During the Model T era, Ford Motor Company of Canada chose not to produce some body types. For instance, sometimes there were no Canadian 2- door Model T sedans. Four-door Model T sedans were made in Canada before they were in the U.S. Four doors were convenient for people going from province to province where right and left drive laws varied.

Some body types were sold under different names. When the American T Runabout was called a Roadster in 1923, Ford Motor Company of Canada continued calling it a Runabout.

It was also in 1923, when Ford called the 2-door sedan a Tudor. Ford Motor Company of Canada adopted the same name for it, and even went further and called the 4-door sedan a Fordor. Ford used that term for many years, but it originated in Canada and used for five years before it was in the States.

The arrival of the Model A brought a much greater variety of body types, though Ford Motor Company of Canada never produced quite all the body styles made south of the border. Model A station wagons, for instance, were never made in Canada.

Ford’s famous V-8 was introduced in mid 1932, simultaneously in both countries. Ford of Canada dropped 4-cylinder cars in 1933, while they were on the market a year longer in the U.S.

The northern firm produced some body types not made in the States. From 1929 through 1936, Rumble Seat models were available in more varieties for Canadians than Americans.

Also for 1936, all Canadian-built Tudors had trunks, while this was not always true in the States. In addition, Canadians were treated to the Special DeLuxe, a top-line series of 10 models above the DeLuxe.

The little 134 cid 60 hp V-8 appeared in both countries in 1937. It was an economical alternative to the regular V-8. But, Ford Motor Company of Canada stopped offering it in the 1939 lineup. It continued to be available in the U.S. until the 1941 models arrived.

Ford’s first 6-cylinder car since the Model K made its debut in the 1941 models. Buyers could choose it or the V-8, but only in the States. Not until many years later did Ford Motor Company of Canada offer a 6-cylinder engine.

The 1941 Fords in both countries came in three series: Special, DeLuxe and Super DeLuxe. There were only two series for 1942, but not the same two in both countries. Ford of Canada kept the entry-level Special and deleted the Super DeLuxe. In contrast, Ford in the States deleted the Special and kept the top-line Super DeLuxe.

Check back in for the next phase of Ford Trucks!


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2020 Ford Edge ST-Line First Look: Edgy Looks, Mundane Powertrain

Source: MotorTrend
How many different ways can Ford slice the performance pie?

In Ford-speak, ST is short for Sport Technologies. It’s like M, AMG, or any of the other performance acronyms we’ve come to know and love over the years. Ford’s ST models are nothing new; it’s ST-Line of vehicles, however, are. Cue the 2020 Ford Edge ST-Line. It is not a variant of the six-cylinder Edge ST. Instead, the Edge ST-Line is a slightly sportier version of Ford’s run-of-the-mill, four-cylinder, mid-size crossover.

In short, the ST-Line brings the looks of the ST, but not its price or performance, to the standard Edge. The model includes sporty-looking body cladding, an ST-style grille, more aggressive side skirts, a set of gloss-black 20-inch wheels, and requisite ST-Line badging (so no one confuses it for a real ST).

Like almost all other Edge models (sans the ST), the ST-Line relies on a 250-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four for motivation. Those horses are routed to the front wheels by way of an eight-speed automatic gearbox. All-wheel-drive, however, is an option. Those looking for a little extra dynamic capability from the Edge ST-Line can opt for the ST Performance Brake package. Ford did not share what comes with the package, but it’s safe to assume the option adds—at the very least—more fade-resistant brake pads. Other options include automatic parking, adaptive cruise control, and a lane-centering system.

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Ford of Canada Producing Face Shields

Source: MRO

Ford Motor Company of Canada, Ltd. began production of face shields at its Windsor Site operations.

Ford of Canada is working with the Ontario and federal governments to distribute face shields in Ontario, and across Canada.

“Ford of Canada has a long history of supporting Canada and its communities in times of need,” said Dean Stoneley, president and CEO, Ford Motor Company of Canada, Ltd. “By repurposing our production facilities in Windsor to meet the urgent demand for face shields, we can help protect the lives of our heroic healthcare professionals and first responders as they continue to treat the most vulnerable among us.”

Ford of Canada has also donated 2,900 pairs of nitrile gloves to the Brampton Civic Hospital, and 80 N95 masks to the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

“I am incredibly grateful to our members at Ford in Windsor for doing a tremendous service for their community and their country during this national emergency,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. “I commend Ford for working with Unifor to ensure that strict health and safety protocols are in place that will ensure our members can manufacture badly needed medical supplies and return home safely to their homes and families.”

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FORD TO PRODUCE 50,000 VENTILATORS IN MICHIGAN IN NEXT 100 DAYS; PARTNERING WITH GE HEALTHCARE WILL HELP CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS

  • Ford, in collaboration with GE Healthcare, will leverage the design of Airon Corp.’s FDA-cleared ventilator to produce in Michigan
  • With the full weight of the UAW behind the venture and the full power of Ford and GE Healthcare, production of the GE/Airon Model A-E ventilator is targeted to start the week of April 20 at Ford’s Rawsonville (Mich.) Components Plant
  • Ford expects to produce 50,000 of the ventilators within the next 100 days, with the ability to produce 30,000 a month thereafter as needed
  • The simplified ventilator design – licensed by GE Healthcare from Florida-based Airon Corp. – is responsive to the needs of most COVID-19 patients, and operates on air pressure without the need for electricity
  • This unique, go-fast initiative comes in addition to the previously announced program by Ford and GE Healthcare to increase production capacity of existing GE Healthcare ventilators

DEARBORN, Mich., March 30, 2020 – Ford Motor Company, in collaboration with GE Healthcare, announced today it will begin producing in Michigan a third-party ventilator with the goal to produce 50,000 of the vitally needed units within 100 days and up to 30,000 a month thereafter as needed.

Ford will provide its manufacturing capabilities to quickly scale production, and GE Healthcare will provide its clinical expertise and will license the current ventilator design from Airon Corp. – a small, privately held company specializing in high-tech pneumatic life support products. GE Healthcare brought the Airon Corp. design to Ford’s attention as part of the companies’ efforts to scale production of ventilators quickly to help clinicians treat COVID-19 patients.

The GE/Airon Model A-E ventilator uses a design that operates on air pressure without the need for electricity, addressing the needs of most COVID-19 patients. Its production can be quickly scaled to help meet growing demand in the U.S.

“The Ford and GE Healthcare teams, working creatively and tirelessly, have found a way to produce this vitally needed ventilator quickly and in meaningful numbers,” said Jim Hackett, Ford’s president and CEO. “By producing this ventilator in Michigan, in strong partnership with the UAW, we can help health care workers save lives, and that’s our No. 1 priority.”

According to White House Defense Production Act Coordinator Peter Navarro, “the Ford/GE Healthcare team is moving in ‘Trump time’ to speed urgently needed ventilators to the front lines of the Trump Administration’s full-scale war against the coronavirus. Just as Ford in the last century moved its manufacturing might seamlessly from auto to tank production during World War II, the Ford team is working with GE Healthcare to use its awesome engineering and manufacturing capabilities to voluntarily help this nation solve one of its most pressing problems. We salute that effort and look forward to the first ventilators rolling off the Michigan assembly line in record time – and we’ll be there to salute that milestone.”

Ford will initially send a team to work with Airon to boost production in Florida, and by the week of April 20, will start production at Ford’s Rawsonville Components Plant in Ypsilanti, Mich., quickly ramping up to reach full production to help meet surging demand.

Ford expects to produce 1,500 by the end of April, 12,000 by the end of May and 50,000 by July 4 – helping the U.S. government meet its goal of producing 100,000 ventilators in 100 days.

Ford’s Rawsonville plant will produce the ventilators nearly around the clock, with 500 paid volunteer UAW-represented employees working on three shifts. Airon currently produces three Airon pNeuton Model A ventilators per day in Melbourne, Fla. At full production, Ford plans to make 7,200 Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilators per week.

“From the days of Rosie the Riveter, UAW members have stepped up during difficult times in this nation’s history for the good of us all,” said UAW International President Rory Gamble. “Today’s announcement by Ford that UAW employees will make ventilators at Rawsonville is in that tradition. We are working very closely with Ford to make sure that all CDC guidelines are followed and that we are exercising an abundance of caution inside the plant. Ford and our UAW Ford members should be commended for stepping up in these very uncertain times.”

The Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilator is the second Ford-GE Healthcare ventilator collaboration. Last week, Ford and GE Healthcare announced a separate effort to produce a simplified ventilator design from GE Healthcare. The combined ventilator supply will help address the increasing surge demand for ventilators around the U.S in the fight against COVID-19, each well suited to meet time, production volume and patient care requirements.

“We applaud Ford for its efforts to lend its manufacturing capabilities to help quickly scale the Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilator and arm clinicians in the fight against COVID-19,” said GE Healthcare President and CEO Kieran Murphy. “Our deep understanding of the health care industry with Ford’s supply chain and production expertise will help meet the unprecedented demand for medical equipment. We continue to be encouraged by how quickly companies are coming together in innovative ways to address this collective challenge.”

GE Heathcare and Ford consulted with medical experts in determining the Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilator is well suited for COVID-19 patient care. The design is expected to meet the needs of most COVID-19 patients with respiratory failure or difficulty breathing. The ventilator is designed for quick setup, making it easy for healthcare workers to use – and can be deployed in an emergency room setting, during special procedures or in an intensive care unit, wherever the patient may be located.

Ford, along with the companies it is supporting, will provide additional updates as these special projects progress.

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2020 Ford Escape vs 2020 Ford Edge Comparison

Source: Autoguide

2020 Ford Escape vs 2020 Ford Edge Comparison

Two strong sellers for the Blue Oval, the Escape and Edge often make up a significant portion of dealership volume. For this model year, the smaller Escape has lost some of its chunky and squared-off charm in favour of more rounded bodywork. After receiving a boatload of changes last year, Edge soldiers on with no powertrain differences but several changes to its colour palette and option packages.

Both are two-row, five-passenger vehicles offering a choice of powertrains and optional all-wheel drive. Read on to see which one best fits your needs.

Powertrains

Escape: For 2020, there is no shortage of powertrain options in the freshly-hewn Escape. The ute makes an opening bid with its 1.5-litre turbocharged three-cylinder making 180 hp and available with front- or all-wheel drive. A boosted 2.0-litre mill makes a healthy 250 ponies and sends power to all four wheels. Hybrid models deploy a 2.5-litre inline-four that, paired with electric propulsion, makes about 200 horsepower. The plug-in hybrid model makes slightly more juice thanks to a more robust pack of electrons.

Edge: For 2020, all Edge models—except the sporty ST—are powered by a turbocharged 2.0-litre four-banger making 250 horsepower and 275 lb-ft of torque. Front-wheel drive is standard on non-STs, with all-wheel drive showing up as an option. The zooty ST comes with all-wheel drive as standard equipment and earns a 2.7-litre turbocharged V6, good for 335 ponies and 380 units of twist. Every Edge gets an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Bottom Line: In the Escape, Ford’s 250hp turbo four is a fine choice but is blunted by Edge’s extra weight. If it’s in the budget, pop for the ST.

Fuel Economy

Escape: As of this writing, the EPA has released mileage estimates for but a single version of the 2020 Escape. The front-wheel-drive 1.5-litre powertrain is estimated to get 33 mpg in highway driving and 27 mpg on a city cycle. Combined, that should make for an even 30 mpg. Adding all-wheel drive will likely ding these numbers by about 1 mpg. Hybrid versions will likely post numbers well into the 30s.

Edge: Ford reckons front-wheel-drive versions of this trucklet should return 21 mpg around town and 29 mpg on the highway. Combined, expect to see somewhere in the neighbourhood of 24 mpg. Adding all-wheel drive drops each of these numbers by a single mpg, save for the city rating which remains the same. It should be noted that the power numbers listed at the beginning of this post are achieved with expensive 93 octane fuel. Oddly, all-wheel versions of the Edge have a slightly larger fuel tank despite the presence of more powertrain gear.

Bottom Line: A lighter weight and smaller footprint make Escape the fuel economy champ here.

Ford Edge

Technology

Escape: This year, the Escape comes standard with Ford Co-Pilot360 and makes available Ford Co-Pilot360 Assist features such as adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go and lane-centring. An available 8.0-inch touch screen shares information with the available 12.3-inch all-digital instrument cluster, dragging Escape firmly into the modern era of infotainment. CarPlay is onboard, along with neato features like Ford+Alexa and Waze navigation.

Edge: Every two-row Edge is equipped with Ford Co-Pilot360, a network of cameras and sensors which can warn of impending doom and attempt to keep drivers from making roadkill out of roadside nature. Evasive steering assist is available on SEL and standard on the top two trims; it’s the same story with adaptive cruise control, which features stop-and-go and lane centring.

Bottom Line: As a newer clean-sheet design, Escape holds an edge over Edge in the tech department. The former’s new driver display and infotainment setup will likely migrate to Edge in time but, for now, Escape take the W.

ford escape cabin space

Cabin Space

Escape: First-row headroom is equal across the board at a too-perfect 40 inches even. This barely changes for backseat passengers who enjoy 39.3 inches for their noggins. Legroom is listed at 42.4 inches in front and 40.7 inches rear when the seats are moved to their furthest-most positions.

Edge: Absent the third row, Edge can seat five people. Front row chairs offer 42.6 inches of legroom and 40.2 inches of headroom. Adding a sunroof shaves a shocking 2.5 inches from that latter figure, so make sure to try before you buy. In a twist, the headroom actually increases by a couple of tenths in the second row while offering 40.6 inches of space for legs. The total passenger volume is 113.9 cubic feet.

Bottom Line: These two vastly different machines somehow offer similar leg- and headroom numbers despite putting down dissimilar footprints. Edge’s extra width pays dividends, however, so all hands may be more comfortable in the bigger car despite its on-paper dimensions.

Style

Escape: New for 2020, the Escape continues its march toward the softer side of crossover and SUV styling, trading some its creases for rounded edges. It certainly looks nothing like the original Escapes with their boxy and rigged profiles. Filling that end of the spectrum will apparently be left for the upcoming so-called Baby Bronco.

Edge: This nameplate has been around for over ten years now and, throughout that tenure, has always tended to look like a rounded-off dinner roll. Model year 2020 is no different, with Edge continuing to be one of the best-looking vehicles in its segment. Snazzy ST version earns special trim and bodywork to let the other parents know you’re wearing Piloti shoes while dropping the kids off at soccer.

Bottom Line: Edge has an advantage here, given the too-soft restyle of Escape that will appeal to some—but not all—buyers.

Cargo Capacity

Escape: Thanks to adjustable seating, Ford chooses to list a pair of dimensions for the rear cargo area in its 2020 Escape. The so-called “optimized” cargo volume measures 33.5 cubes while sliding all chairs as far forward as possible adds an extra four cubes. Hybrid models suffer slightly in the cargo department thanks to their extra propulsion gear, with the cargo area measuring 30.7 and 34.4 cubic feet in “optimized” and maximum measures, respectively.

Edge: Not having to house the third row of passengers works to Edge’s advantage, as a generous 39.2 cubic feet of space exists for cargo behind the second-row bench. Flipping that seat flat opens up a cavernous 73.4 cubic feet of room. Liftover height, the vertical measurement from the ground to a car’s cargo floor, is about thirty inches.

Bottom Line: There’s no arguing physics and geometry, as the Edge can clearly hold more cargo simply because it’s a larger box.

2019 Ford Edge Titanium Elite

Pricing

Escape: Fresh off a redesign, it has a starting MSRP of $26,080 (including $1,195 in destination). All-wheel drive is a $1500 option at this level. It must be noted that Ford should be commended for offering AWD on the base trim, something not done by all manufacturers. Hybrid versions begin their pricing at a reasonable $29,420. High zoot gas-powered Titanium models knock on the door of $40,000 once all options are selected

Edge: In the US, Edge starts at $32,295 for an entry-level SE model that no one buys. Volume-leader SEL trim is $35,550 while that hi-po ST you really want is a heady $44,460. Adding all-wheel drive tack $1995 to the bill and there are plenty of convenience packages to pad the total as well. In a fit of corporate responsibility, Ford doesn’t limit the high-tech safety kit like adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go braking to just top models; it is available as a stand-alone option for $795.

Bottom Line: Restraint should be exercised with the options list on both Edge and Escape, as wanton checking of feature boxes will drive the price of either vehicle far beyond its real-world value. Sticking to a well-equipped mid-grade trim is the smart play.

Verdict: Ford Escape vs Ford Edge

Blue Oval fans will find a lot to like in both these machines, as they are infused with easily recognizable Ford DNA throughout. They are smartly packaged two-row trucklets and have the ability to carry people or cargo with ease. Selecting the all-wheel-drive will likely help with a residual value at trade-in time. If Ford’s latest and greatest tech is on your list, sample the Escape. Those with extra cargo or passenger demands should check out the Edge.

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