Ford Canada: A Heritage as Rich as the Land Itself

Enjoy 100+ years of sometimes exclusive, always exciting cars & trucks built by Ford of Canada

Pre-War Fords

Canada’s climate is colder, its population is smaller, and its economy is different compared with the United States. These and other factors have set the stage for some fascinating differences in Canadian cars over the last century. Even cars produced by the same manufacturer often digressed from the American pattern. What follows is a review of the uniqueness found in many vehicles produced by the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited during its long and illustrious history.

The first car built by the Ford Motor Company of Canada in early 1904 was the Model C. A total of 117 cars were made in the first year. Most were 2-cylinder Model C’s but a few 4-cylinder Model B’s were also built. Both were made in 1905 along with the Model F, a new 2-cylinder car.

In 1906, the Model C and Model B were discontinued, but two new models came on the scene. The Model N was a low-priced 4-cylinder car, but the 406 cid 6-cylinder Model K was huge and expensive.

The Model F was gone by 1907, but there were two new Fords – Model R and Model S. Both were 4-cylinder cars, and built along with the Model N and Model K through much of 1908.

Production of all those models ceased when the Model T made its debut in October 1908. The Canadian-made Fords were similar to the American models, although there may have been minor departures due to the use of Canadian components. Ford Motor Company of Canada constantly tried to keep a high level of Canadian content.

During the Model T era, Ford Motor Company of Canada chose not to produce some body types. For instance, sometimes there were no Canadian 2- door Model T sedans. Four-door Model T sedans were made in Canada before they were in the U.S. Four doors were convenient for people going from province to province where right and left drive laws varied.

Some body types were sold under different names. When the American T Runabout was called a Roadster in 1923, Ford Motor Company of Canada continued calling it a Runabout.

It was also in 1923, when Ford called the 2-door sedan a Tudor. Ford Motor Company of Canada adopted the same name for it, and even went further and called the 4-door sedan a Fordor. Ford used that term for many years, but it originated in Canada and used for five years before it was in the States.

The arrival of the Model A brought a much greater variety of body types, though Ford Motor Company of Canada never produced quite all the body styles made south of the border. Model A station wagons, for instance, were never made in Canada.

Ford’s famous V-8 was introduced in mid 1932, simultaneously in both countries. Ford of Canada dropped 4-cylinder cars in 1933, while they were on the market a year longer in the U.S.

The northern firm produced some body types not made in the States. From 1929 through 1936, Rumble Seat models were available in more varieties for Canadians than Americans.

Also for 1936, all Canadian-built Tudors had trunks, while this was not always true in the States. In addition, Canadians were treated to the Special DeLuxe, a top-line series of 10 models above the DeLuxe.

The little 134 cid 60 hp V-8 appeared in both countries in 1937. It was an economical alternative to the regular V-8. But, Ford Motor Company of Canada stopped offering it in the 1939 lineup. It continued to be available in the U.S. until the 1941 models arrived.

Ford’s first 6-cylinder car since the Model K made its debut in the 1941 models. Buyers could choose it or the V-8, but only in the States. Not until many years later did Ford Motor Company of Canada offer a 6-cylinder engine.

The 1941 Fords in both countries came in three series: Special, DeLuxe and Super DeLuxe. There were only two series for 1942, but not the same two in both countries. Ford of Canada kept the entry-level Special and deleted the Super DeLuxe. In contrast, Ford in the States deleted the Special and kept the top-line Super DeLuxe.

Check back in for the next phase of Ford Trucks!


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2020 Ford Edge ST-Line First Look: Edgy Looks, Mundane Powertrain

Source: MotorTrend
How many different ways can Ford slice the performance pie?

In Ford-speak, ST is short for Sport Technologies. It’s like M, AMG, or any of the other performance acronyms we’ve come to know and love over the years. Ford’s ST models are nothing new; it’s ST-Line of vehicles, however, are. Cue the 2020 Ford Edge ST-Line. It is not a variant of the six-cylinder Edge ST. Instead, the Edge ST-Line is a slightly sportier version of Ford’s run-of-the-mill, four-cylinder, mid-size crossover.

In short, the ST-Line brings the looks of the ST, but not its price or performance, to the standard Edge. The model includes sporty-looking body cladding, an ST-style grille, more aggressive side skirts, a set of gloss-black 20-inch wheels, and requisite ST-Line badging (so no one confuses it for a real ST).

Like almost all other Edge models (sans the ST), the ST-Line relies on a 250-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four for motivation. Those horses are routed to the front wheels by way of an eight-speed automatic gearbox. All-wheel-drive, however, is an option. Those looking for a little extra dynamic capability from the Edge ST-Line can opt for the ST Performance Brake package. Ford did not share what comes with the package, but it’s safe to assume the option adds—at the very least—more fade-resistant brake pads. Other options include automatic parking, adaptive cruise control, and a lane-centering system.

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Ford of Canada Producing Face Shields

Source: MRO

Ford Motor Company of Canada, Ltd. began production of face shields at its Windsor Site operations.

Ford of Canada is working with the Ontario and federal governments to distribute face shields in Ontario, and across Canada.

“Ford of Canada has a long history of supporting Canada and its communities in times of need,” said Dean Stoneley, president and CEO, Ford Motor Company of Canada, Ltd. “By repurposing our production facilities in Windsor to meet the urgent demand for face shields, we can help protect the lives of our heroic healthcare professionals and first responders as they continue to treat the most vulnerable among us.”

Ford of Canada has also donated 2,900 pairs of nitrile gloves to the Brampton Civic Hospital, and 80 N95 masks to the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

“I am incredibly grateful to our members at Ford in Windsor for doing a tremendous service for their community and their country during this national emergency,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. “I commend Ford for working with Unifor to ensure that strict health and safety protocols are in place that will ensure our members can manufacture badly needed medical supplies and return home safely to their homes and families.”

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FORD TO PRODUCE 50,000 VENTILATORS IN MICHIGAN IN NEXT 100 DAYS; PARTNERING WITH GE HEALTHCARE WILL HELP CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS

  • Ford, in collaboration with GE Healthcare, will leverage the design of Airon Corp.’s FDA-cleared ventilator to produce in Michigan
  • With the full weight of the UAW behind the venture and the full power of Ford and GE Healthcare, production of the GE/Airon Model A-E ventilator is targeted to start the week of April 20 at Ford’s Rawsonville (Mich.) Components Plant
  • Ford expects to produce 50,000 of the ventilators within the next 100 days, with the ability to produce 30,000 a month thereafter as needed
  • The simplified ventilator design – licensed by GE Healthcare from Florida-based Airon Corp. – is responsive to the needs of most COVID-19 patients, and operates on air pressure without the need for electricity
  • This unique, go-fast initiative comes in addition to the previously announced program by Ford and GE Healthcare to increase production capacity of existing GE Healthcare ventilators

DEARBORN, Mich., March 30, 2020 – Ford Motor Company, in collaboration with GE Healthcare, announced today it will begin producing in Michigan a third-party ventilator with the goal to produce 50,000 of the vitally needed units within 100 days and up to 30,000 a month thereafter as needed.

Ford will provide its manufacturing capabilities to quickly scale production, and GE Healthcare will provide its clinical expertise and will license the current ventilator design from Airon Corp. – a small, privately held company specializing in high-tech pneumatic life support products. GE Healthcare brought the Airon Corp. design to Ford’s attention as part of the companies’ efforts to scale production of ventilators quickly to help clinicians treat COVID-19 patients.

The GE/Airon Model A-E ventilator uses a design that operates on air pressure without the need for electricity, addressing the needs of most COVID-19 patients. Its production can be quickly scaled to help meet growing demand in the U.S.

“The Ford and GE Healthcare teams, working creatively and tirelessly, have found a way to produce this vitally needed ventilator quickly and in meaningful numbers,” said Jim Hackett, Ford’s president and CEO. “By producing this ventilator in Michigan, in strong partnership with the UAW, we can help health care workers save lives, and that’s our No. 1 priority.”

According to White House Defense Production Act Coordinator Peter Navarro, “the Ford/GE Healthcare team is moving in ‘Trump time’ to speed urgently needed ventilators to the front lines of the Trump Administration’s full-scale war against the coronavirus. Just as Ford in the last century moved its manufacturing might seamlessly from auto to tank production during World War II, the Ford team is working with GE Healthcare to use its awesome engineering and manufacturing capabilities to voluntarily help this nation solve one of its most pressing problems. We salute that effort and look forward to the first ventilators rolling off the Michigan assembly line in record time – and we’ll be there to salute that milestone.”

Ford will initially send a team to work with Airon to boost production in Florida, and by the week of April 20, will start production at Ford’s Rawsonville Components Plant in Ypsilanti, Mich., quickly ramping up to reach full production to help meet surging demand.

Ford expects to produce 1,500 by the end of April, 12,000 by the end of May and 50,000 by July 4 – helping the U.S. government meet its goal of producing 100,000 ventilators in 100 days.

Ford’s Rawsonville plant will produce the ventilators nearly around the clock, with 500 paid volunteer UAW-represented employees working on three shifts. Airon currently produces three Airon pNeuton Model A ventilators per day in Melbourne, Fla. At full production, Ford plans to make 7,200 Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilators per week.

“From the days of Rosie the Riveter, UAW members have stepped up during difficult times in this nation’s history for the good of us all,” said UAW International President Rory Gamble. “Today’s announcement by Ford that UAW employees will make ventilators at Rawsonville is in that tradition. We are working very closely with Ford to make sure that all CDC guidelines are followed and that we are exercising an abundance of caution inside the plant. Ford and our UAW Ford members should be commended for stepping up in these very uncertain times.”

The Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilator is the second Ford-GE Healthcare ventilator collaboration. Last week, Ford and GE Healthcare announced a separate effort to produce a simplified ventilator design from GE Healthcare. The combined ventilator supply will help address the increasing surge demand for ventilators around the U.S in the fight against COVID-19, each well suited to meet time, production volume and patient care requirements.

“We applaud Ford for its efforts to lend its manufacturing capabilities to help quickly scale the Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilator and arm clinicians in the fight against COVID-19,” said GE Healthcare President and CEO Kieran Murphy. “Our deep understanding of the health care industry with Ford’s supply chain and production expertise will help meet the unprecedented demand for medical equipment. We continue to be encouraged by how quickly companies are coming together in innovative ways to address this collective challenge.”

GE Heathcare and Ford consulted with medical experts in determining the Airon-licensed Model A-E ventilator is well suited for COVID-19 patient care. The design is expected to meet the needs of most COVID-19 patients with respiratory failure or difficulty breathing. The ventilator is designed for quick setup, making it easy for healthcare workers to use – and can be deployed in an emergency room setting, during special procedures or in an intensive care unit, wherever the patient may be located.

Ford, along with the companies it is supporting, will provide additional updates as these special projects progress.

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2020 Ford Escape vs 2020 Ford Edge Comparison

Source: Autoguide

2020 Ford Escape vs 2020 Ford Edge Comparison

Two strong sellers for the Blue Oval, the Escape and Edge often make up a significant portion of dealership volume. For this model year, the smaller Escape has lost some of its chunky and squared-off charm in favour of more rounded bodywork. After receiving a boatload of changes last year, Edge soldiers on with no powertrain differences but several changes to its colour palette and option packages.

Both are two-row, five-passenger vehicles offering a choice of powertrains and optional all-wheel drive. Read on to see which one best fits your needs.

Powertrains

Escape: For 2020, there is no shortage of powertrain options in the freshly-hewn Escape. The ute makes an opening bid with its 1.5-litre turbocharged three-cylinder making 180 hp and available with front- or all-wheel drive. A boosted 2.0-litre mill makes a healthy 250 ponies and sends power to all four wheels. Hybrid models deploy a 2.5-litre inline-four that, paired with electric propulsion, makes about 200 horsepower. The plug-in hybrid model makes slightly more juice thanks to a more robust pack of electrons.

Edge: For 2020, all Edge models—except the sporty ST—are powered by a turbocharged 2.0-litre four-banger making 250 horsepower and 275 lb-ft of torque. Front-wheel drive is standard on non-STs, with all-wheel drive showing up as an option. The zooty ST comes with all-wheel drive as standard equipment and earns a 2.7-litre turbocharged V6, good for 335 ponies and 380 units of twist. Every Edge gets an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Bottom Line: In the Escape, Ford’s 250hp turbo four is a fine choice but is blunted by Edge’s extra weight. If it’s in the budget, pop for the ST.

Fuel Economy

Escape: As of this writing, the EPA has released mileage estimates for but a single version of the 2020 Escape. The front-wheel-drive 1.5-litre powertrain is estimated to get 33 mpg in highway driving and 27 mpg on a city cycle. Combined, that should make for an even 30 mpg. Adding all-wheel drive will likely ding these numbers by about 1 mpg. Hybrid versions will likely post numbers well into the 30s.

Edge: Ford reckons front-wheel-drive versions of this trucklet should return 21 mpg around town and 29 mpg on the highway. Combined, expect to see somewhere in the neighbourhood of 24 mpg. Adding all-wheel drive drops each of these numbers by a single mpg, save for the city rating which remains the same. It should be noted that the power numbers listed at the beginning of this post are achieved with expensive 93 octane fuel. Oddly, all-wheel versions of the Edge have a slightly larger fuel tank despite the presence of more powertrain gear.

Bottom Line: A lighter weight and smaller footprint make Escape the fuel economy champ here.

Ford Edge

Technology

Escape: This year, the Escape comes standard with Ford Co-Pilot360 and makes available Ford Co-Pilot360 Assist features such as adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go and lane-centring. An available 8.0-inch touch screen shares information with the available 12.3-inch all-digital instrument cluster, dragging Escape firmly into the modern era of infotainment. CarPlay is onboard, along with neato features like Ford+Alexa and Waze navigation.

Edge: Every two-row Edge is equipped with Ford Co-Pilot360, a network of cameras and sensors which can warn of impending doom and attempt to keep drivers from making roadkill out of roadside nature. Evasive steering assist is available on SEL and standard on the top two trims; it’s the same story with adaptive cruise control, which features stop-and-go and lane centring.

Bottom Line: As a newer clean-sheet design, Escape holds an edge over Edge in the tech department. The former’s new driver display and infotainment setup will likely migrate to Edge in time but, for now, Escape take the W.

ford escape cabin space

Cabin Space

Escape: First-row headroom is equal across the board at a too-perfect 40 inches even. This barely changes for backseat passengers who enjoy 39.3 inches for their noggins. Legroom is listed at 42.4 inches in front and 40.7 inches rear when the seats are moved to their furthest-most positions.

Edge: Absent the third row, Edge can seat five people. Front row chairs offer 42.6 inches of legroom and 40.2 inches of headroom. Adding a sunroof shaves a shocking 2.5 inches from that latter figure, so make sure to try before you buy. In a twist, the headroom actually increases by a couple of tenths in the second row while offering 40.6 inches of space for legs. The total passenger volume is 113.9 cubic feet.

Bottom Line: These two vastly different machines somehow offer similar leg- and headroom numbers despite putting down dissimilar footprints. Edge’s extra width pays dividends, however, so all hands may be more comfortable in the bigger car despite its on-paper dimensions.

Style

Escape: New for 2020, the Escape continues its march toward the softer side of crossover and SUV styling, trading some its creases for rounded edges. It certainly looks nothing like the original Escapes with their boxy and rigged profiles. Filling that end of the spectrum will apparently be left for the upcoming so-called Baby Bronco.

Edge: This nameplate has been around for over ten years now and, throughout that tenure, has always tended to look like a rounded-off dinner roll. Model year 2020 is no different, with Edge continuing to be one of the best-looking vehicles in its segment. Snazzy ST version earns special trim and bodywork to let the other parents know you’re wearing Piloti shoes while dropping the kids off at soccer.

Bottom Line: Edge has an advantage here, given the too-soft restyle of Escape that will appeal to some—but not all—buyers.

Cargo Capacity

Escape: Thanks to adjustable seating, Ford chooses to list a pair of dimensions for the rear cargo area in its 2020 Escape. The so-called “optimized” cargo volume measures 33.5 cubes while sliding all chairs as far forward as possible adds an extra four cubes. Hybrid models suffer slightly in the cargo department thanks to their extra propulsion gear, with the cargo area measuring 30.7 and 34.4 cubic feet in “optimized” and maximum measures, respectively.

Edge: Not having to house the third row of passengers works to Edge’s advantage, as a generous 39.2 cubic feet of space exists for cargo behind the second-row bench. Flipping that seat flat opens up a cavernous 73.4 cubic feet of room. Liftover height, the vertical measurement from the ground to a car’s cargo floor, is about thirty inches.

Bottom Line: There’s no arguing physics and geometry, as the Edge can clearly hold more cargo simply because it’s a larger box.

2019 Ford Edge Titanium Elite

Pricing

Escape: Fresh off a redesign, it has a starting MSRP of $26,080 (including $1,195 in destination). All-wheel drive is a $1500 option at this level. It must be noted that Ford should be commended for offering AWD on the base trim, something not done by all manufacturers. Hybrid versions begin their pricing at a reasonable $29,420. High zoot gas-powered Titanium models knock on the door of $40,000 once all options are selected

Edge: In the US, Edge starts at $32,295 for an entry-level SE model that no one buys. Volume-leader SEL trim is $35,550 while that hi-po ST you really want is a heady $44,460. Adding all-wheel drive tack $1995 to the bill and there are plenty of convenience packages to pad the total as well. In a fit of corporate responsibility, Ford doesn’t limit the high-tech safety kit like adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go braking to just top models; it is available as a stand-alone option for $795.

Bottom Line: Restraint should be exercised with the options list on both Edge and Escape, as wanton checking of feature boxes will drive the price of either vehicle far beyond its real-world value. Sticking to a well-equipped mid-grade trim is the smart play.

Verdict: Ford Escape vs Ford Edge

Blue Oval fans will find a lot to like in both these machines, as they are infused with easily recognizable Ford DNA throughout. They are smartly packaged two-row trucklets and have the ability to carry people or cargo with ease. Selecting the all-wheel-drive will likely help with a residual value at trade-in time. If Ford’s latest and greatest tech is on your list, sample the Escape. Those with extra cargo or passenger demands should check out the Edge.

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Ford says reservations full for high-end version of electric Mustang Mach-E

mach-e-live-bloomberg-front-passenger.jpg
The Mach-E was unveiled in Los Angeles in November. It will be built in Mexico.

Ford Motor Co. said on Monday reservations were full for the high-end Mustang Mach-E First Edition electric crossover vehicle.

Ford Canada on Tuesday confirmed to Automotive News Canada that “all First Edition is sold out in Canada.”

The No. 2 U.S. automaker unveiled the electric Mustang on Nov. 17 and began taking reservations with a refundable deposit of US$500 in the United States. A deposit was not required in Canada. There will be four other versions of the Mach-E in addition to the First Edition.

Ford did not provide details on how many reservations it took for the First Edition, which will be priced at about US$60,000 in the United States, but has said global production in the first 12 months for all versions of the Mach-E is limited to 50,000 vehicles. Canadian pricing hasn’t been released.

The Mach-E has become a high-profile test for a restructuring at Ford that has been marred by profit warnings, costly quality problems and the troubled launch this year of another important vehicle, the Ford Explorer utility vehicle.

The Mach-E was unveiled in Los Angeles in November. It will be built in Mexico, the first of more than a dozen all-electric vehicles Ford plans to launch by 2022 with an investment of US$11.5 billion. The Mach-E’s design was inspired by the classic 1960s Mustang sports car and is meant to challenge electric carmaker Tesla Inc.

More than 80 percent of U.S. customers are reserving Mach-E with an extended range battery, while about 55 percent opted for an all-wheel drive, Ford said in a statement released Monday. Ford Canada didn’t provide a similar breakdown.

More than 25 percent of the reservations are from California, with nearly 30 percent of U.S. customers choosing Mach-E GT, the company said.

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Built Ford Proud

Image result for built ford proud

From day one, we have been the car company for everyone, making it possible for hardworking, everyday people to own a vehicle. And not just any car or truck, but a vehicle that was well built. And that people would be proud to own and drive.

One hundred and fifteen years later, that is still the case. Born in Detroit, made in America and famous worldwide: We are the Ford Motor Company.

There’s a lot about us that hasn’t changed, and isn’t going to. We are still a family business. We are still builders. We are still inventor-led. We believe in looking to the future to guide our present. We believe it’s better to be right than to be first. And we believe persistence can solve anything and everything.

We’ve seen a lot of people, businesses and ideas come and go. We’ve seen many in the auto industry turn off the lights for good. But we’ve made it through the hard times and have come out stronger for them.

And soon you’ll see an onslaught of new Ford vehicles in the hot-selling SUV and truck segments. That includes the 2019 Ford Ranger pickup which starts production this month at our Michigan Assembly Plant. And the new Escape and Explorer will be available next year. In fact, approximately 75 percent of the Ford vehicle lineup will be all-new by 2020.

We are proud to be a car company – that’s the centre of everything we do and that’s why we put our family name on all that we build. From the Ford family that’s still involved with both future and daily work, to our extended family of more than 200,000 employees worldwide, we build with pride. We build with care. And everything we make is made in one way and one way only: Built Ford Proud.

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Canadians on the verge of having more electrified vehicle choices

Source: Ford.ca

Ford Electric 2020
By Mark Buzzell President and CEO, Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited

The automotive industry is changing, with a spirit of innovation transforming our business in ways, and at a pace, we’ve never seen before. For more than a century, Canadians have put a lot of faith in Ford, and we appreciate and value that trust. It’s why when we decide to make changes, like revolutionizing Ford F-Series pickups with high-strength aluminum alloy, we only do so after a lot of thought, research and careful consideration.

Looking ahead, Ford has a bold strategy that includes going “all-in” on electrified vehicles. Earlier this year, the company announced a US$11 billion investment in electrification, with plans to put 40 new electrified vehicles on the road by 2022, bringing more capability, performance and efficiency to nameplates Canadians already know and love, from F-150 to Mustang to our entire utilities lineup.

Yet with more electrified vehicles available to Canadians than ever before, consumer adoption remains low, at about two per cent of all new car sales.  Still, Ford remains committed to electrification because we believe a consumer shift is on the way, and it’s the right thing to do.

More than a decade ago, Ford was a pioneer with the first-ever hybrid-electric SUV – the groundbreaking Ford Escape Hybrid. A lot has changed since then, with battery research and development costs coming down, vehicle range improving, growing investment in charging infrastructure, and increased consumer adoption.

Change can be a very good thing, and Ford believes electrification is on its way to a tipping point, as improved technology, capability and infrastructure meet increasing consumer demand. These improvements are allowing Ford to bring new, capable and electrifying vehicles to market that truly meet the diverse needs and expectations of Canadians.

F-Series has been Canada’s best-selling truck for 52 years and counting, and like every truck in our lineup, the upcoming hybrid F-150 will make no compromises. Ford’s first hybrid-electric pickup will provide added capability, from low-end torque for extra pulling power to serving as a mobile generator on the job site.

When it comes to sports cars, Mustang has been Canada’s favourite since 1985, delivering the looks, options and performance customers love. The future hybrid-electric Mustang will add to the iconic pony car’s legacy by delivering V8-like performance with more low-end torque.

For Canadians looking at Ford’s leading utilities lineup, we’re going to maximize vehicle capability while improving fuel efficiency. In fact, whenever we launch a new utility in North America, we plan to offer a hybrid, plug-in hybrid, or both.

All of this is possible because we’ve designed a new hybrid-electric system that’s more efficient and less expensive than previous generations, while also freeing up cargo space reserved for the battery in today’s hybrids.  That means a lower cost of ownership for customers and more cabin space.

These new electrified vehicles are an example of how Ford is bringing more emotion to our line-up, offering customers products that don’t compromise on style, room, capability or range.

However, they’re just the tip of the iceberg. Ford is also bringing a suite of battery electric vehicles to market, starting in 2020 with our first-ever electric performance utility.

Just as the Escape Hybrid turned heads back in 2004, this all-new electric utility will break new ground in 2020, with expected range of at least 480 kilometres on a single charge while maximizing capability. It’s the first of many new Ford offerings that will change the way you think about electric vehicles.

At the heart of it all, we believe battery electric vehicles represent more than just a different powertrain. They also represent a lifestyle change for consumers, particularly those who have never driven one before.

It’s why Ford isn’t just developing new vehicles – we’re also rethinking the ownership journey to ensure we provide consumers a convenient and seamless experience. This means effortless and efficient charging at home and on the road, software updates over the air to enhance vehicle features, and continuously innovating battery technology to give consumers more capability, performance and range.

By offering a broad range of electrified vehicle options and addressing key consumer pain points around ownership, we can eliminate many of the barriers that have held back broader adoption. This is important, because we want to provide Canadians with vehicles and services that fit their unique lifestyles, and we want to continue to earn their trust with every decision we make.

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2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Pricing is Finally Unveiled

Source: The Car Guide

The all-new and almighty 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 will go on sale across Canada in just a few weeks and we can’t wait to drive it, especially after spending some time in the Shelby GT350.

Last week, Ford announced its U.S. pricing and a lot of fans this side of the border took note. The Car Guide contacted the PR team at Ford Canada and was able to get the missing info we were looking for. Here it is: the Shelby GT500 will start at $94,675.

For the record, the current 2019 Shelby GT350 and GT350R carry a base MSRP of $75,600 and $85,600, respectively.

These two, by the way, are available with racing stripes at $600, but the ultimate Mustang is already announcing hand-painted racing stripes costing as much as $10,000 USD. Their Canadian price has yet to be disclosed; we’ll likely find it out when the online configurator goes up on the Ford Canada website.

Let’s remind you of the eye-popping specs for the 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500. With 760 horsepower on tap, it’s more powerful than the Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 (650 hp) and Corvette ZR1 (755 hp), but not quite as much as the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye (797 hp), which is about $500 cheaper.

Photo: Ford

Drivers will also get 625 pound-feet of torque from the supercharged 5.2-litre V8 engine that runs on 93-octane premium gasoline.

As the most aerodynamically advanced, quickest-accelerating stock Mustang ever, the Shelby GT500 can go from 0-100 km/h in an estimated 3.5 seconds before completing the quarter-mile in less than 11 seconds.

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